James BaldwinDaniel Bretton Tisdale
2007
Graphite on paper.

James Baldwin
Daniel Bretton Tisdale
2007
Graphite on paper.

Still Life with PomegranateMark Scheider
2012

Still Life with Pomegranate
Mark Scheider
2012

Blessings Upon the Land of my LoveImran Qureshi
2011
Emulsion and acrylic on brick.

Video of Imran Qureshi speaking about his work.

Blessings Upon the Land of my Love
Imran Qureshi
2011
Emulsion and acrylic on brick.

Video of Imran Qureshi speaking about his work.

Frida Kahlo: Self-Portrait Dedicated to Leon Trotsky (1937); Self-Portrait with Stalin (1954).

"Kahlo’s biographers … suggest that the inscription on Self-Portrait (Dedicated to Leon Trotsky), which begins, ‘Para Leon Trotsky, con todo cariño, dedico ésta pintura’ (For Leon Trotsky with love, I dedicate this painting), indicates Kahlo’s unabated affection … Noting that the painting was produced and given to Trotsky after the affair had ended, [Hayden] Herrera submits that Kahlo intended the self-portrait to ‘tease her ex-lover,’ suggesting that in the painting the artist ‘is dressed fit to kill’ … Her description of Kahlo’s demure, turn-of-the century, western clothing as dressing ‘fit to kill’ clearly is based on the knowledge that Kahlo and Trotsky had an affair rather than on the visual appearance of Kahlo in the self-portrait. Yet other writers share Herrera’s interpretation, suggesting that Kahlo surreptitiously portrayed herself with the intent of captivating Trotsky’s libidinous interest. …

"Writers focusing on Kahlo’s infatuation offer contrasting accounts of her relationship. On one hand, Kahlo is described as an adoring apprentice Trotskyite, naive to the nuances of Trotskyism, but infatuated with the famous revolutionary. … On the other hand, she is cast as dangerously manipulative and coy. … In essence, interpretations of the painting, and of the affair, construct contradictory character portraits of Kahlo; yet both fit squarely with gender stereotypes. In one instance, she submits to a subordinate relationship to the male revolutionary ‘authority.’ In the other, as seductive mistress, she represents the dangerously coy and manipulative fallen-woman/whore persona. Interestingly, in both narratives Trotsky’s mythic status is nearly unshaken; his character largely maintained as the ‘great man,’ the revolutionary hero.

"Just as Trotsky’s sexuality has been exempt in discussions of the painting, there has been no consideration of Kahlo’s possible political sentiment. The dedicatory note … continues with a date, ‘the 7th of November, 1937.’ The date marks the twentieth anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution, the essence of Trotsky’s public identity and a direct reference to his political stature. Yet because the painting exemplifies the prescribed style and subject matter of diminutive feminine art, the dedicatory note ‘with love’ has obscured political intimations, thereby leading writers to discuss the artist’s sexual rather than political affairs…. [I]nterpretations of Kahlo’s painting consider the politics of class, culture, and ideology to be irrelevant. Instead, she is categorically marginalized as a woman painter depicting impassioned expression. …

"It is not surprising that Kahlo’s association with Trotsky has been cast as purely sexual while historical events beyond the artist’s private life have been given little attention, for a discussion of political content would be an acknowledgment that Kahlo crossed a gendered boundary by entering a masculine, political realm in addition to exhibiting aggressive sexual behavior and presuming to produce marketable works of art. Thus in addition to characterizing the nature of Kahlo’s personal feelings toward Trotsky, some interpretations of the painting exemplify how women are confined to feminine prescription, locked out of male-dominated critical, political discourse."

Lindauer, Margaret, Devouring Frida: The Art History and Popular Celebrity of Frida Kahlo. Hanover: University of New England, 1999.

Objects of KhiamJoana Hadjithomas & Khalil Joreige
1999
Photograph of a string of beads made from olive stones and thread.

"While shooting our film Khiam (2008) in a detention camp in south Lebanon, we were deeply moved to hear resistance fighters and activists explain how they would chafe their fingers sculpting a stone into a heart, or rub olive stones against a wall, which they would then wrap in the thread they had unravelled from their socks to turn them into a string of beads. The detainees, locked in a dehumanizing place, braved torture every day in order to create. They battled, thieved, lied or disobeyed to persevere, to create, moved by what could be called an artistic urge. And this is to be found in all places of arbitrary confinement. Whenever there is an attempt to enslave man, there is also resistance, disobedience, a surge toward art.”

— Frieze, Issue 147, May 2012.

Objects of Khiam
Joana Hadjithomas & Khalil Joreige
1999
Photograph of a string of beads made from olive stones and thread.

"While shooting our film Khiam (2008) in a detention camp in south Lebanon, we were deeply moved to hear resistance fighters and activists explain how they would chafe their fingers sculpting a stone into a heart, or rub olive stones against a wall, which they would then wrap in the thread they had unravelled from their socks to turn them into a string of beads. The detainees, locked in a dehumanizing place, braved torture every day in order to create. They battled, thieved, lied or disobeyed to persevere, to create, moved by what could be called an artistic urge. And this is to be found in all places of arbitrary confinement. Whenever there is an attempt to enslave man, there is also resistance, disobedience, a surge toward art.”

Frieze, Issue 147, May 2012.

"Never Forget Emmett Till, Always Remember Trayvon Martin"Dáreece Jordan Walker
Charcoal on corrugated cardboard.
2012.

"Never Forget Emmett Till, Always Remember Trayvon Martin"
Dáreece Jordan Walker
Charcoal on corrugated cardboard.
2012.

(via drox)

Thierry Ehrmann in Lyon, France.

Thierry Ehrmann in Lyon, France.

 R/MQ1 Model (Predator Drone Constructed Anachronistically)John Houck
2010

C-print of basswood model.

"The drone you refer to — constructed in the outmoded, anachronistic form of a model airplane — is both monumental and diminutive because of the ambivalent scale. Presented as product photography, the work depicts a weapon now synonymous with the US military-industrial complex as a hobbyist project." - J.H.

See Also: James Bridle: Dronestagram | Drone Shadows

R/MQ1 Model (Predator Drone Constructed Anachronistically)
John Houck
2010

C-print of basswood model.

"The drone you refer to — constructed in the outmoded, anachronistic form of a model airplane — is both monumental and diminutive because of the ambivalent scale. Presented as product photography, the work depicts a weapon now synonymous with the US military-industrial complex as a hobbyist project." - J.H.

See Also: James Bridle: Dronestagram | Drone Shadows

Daisy Rockwell

Guards
Acrylic on wooden panel, 14” x 14”.

Bus Ride
Acrylic on wooden panel, 12” x 18”.

(shreedaisy)

Shahzia Sikander on “The Last Post,” 2010.
Art21, episode #172.

"There is a moment in the animation where the symbolic figure of the East India Company man sort of explodes."

Ever in Los Angeles.

(via StreetArtNews)

Ever in Los Angeles.

(via StreetArtNews)

Harm Less
Sonia Rentsch
2012

(via soniarentsch.com)

A side view of Lathyrus odoratus L. Macoto Murayama
2012

(via Smithsonian)

A side view of Lathyrus odoratus L.
Macoto Murayama
2012

(via Smithsonian)

Nolli’s OrdersDiana Al-Hadid
2012 

Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint.
264 x 228 x 122 in. (670.6 x 579.1 x 309.9 cm)

(See also: Video on Al-Hadid filmed during the production of this piece, via Art21.)

Nolli’s Orders
Diana Al-Hadid
2012 

Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint.
264 x 228 x 122 in. (670.6 x 579.1 x 309.9 cm)

(See also: Video on Al-Hadid filmed during the production of this piece, via Art21.)

A Mural for Mina Daniel

(photo by Hossam el-Hamalawy)

A Mural for Mina Daniel

(photo by Hossam el-Hamalawy)

Opaque  by  andbamnan