"All civilian casualties are unintended by us but actually intended by Hamas. They want to pile up as many civilian dead as they can because somebody said, and I mean, it’s gruesome, but they use telegenically-dead Palestinians for their cause. They want the more dead, the better."

Benjamin Netanyahu, 20 July 2014, CNN.

"To photographic corroboration of the atrocities committed by one’s own side, the standard response is that the pictures are a fabrication, that no such atrocity ever took place, those were bodies the other side had brought in trucks from the city morgue and placed about the street, or that, yes, it happened and it was the other side who did it, to themselves. Thus the chief of propaganda for Franco’s Nationalist rebellion maintained that it was the Basques who had destroyed their own ancient town and former capital, Guernica, on April 26, 1937, by placing dynamite in the sewers (in a later version, by dropping bombs manufactured in Basque territory) in order to inspire indignation abroad and reinforce the Republican resistance. And thus a majority of Serbs living in Serbia or abroad maintained right to the end of the Serb siege of Sarajevo, and even after, that the Bosnians themselves perpetrated the horrific ‘breadline massacre’ in May 1992 and ‘market massacre’ in February 1994, lobbing large-caliber shells into the center of their capital or planting mines in order to create some exceptionally gruesome sights for the foreign journalists’ cameras and rally more international support for the Bosnian side."

Sontag, Susan. Regarding the Pain of Others. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2003.

Though I Know the River is DryFilm still: Kais Nashef in Qalandia.

I am not sure for how long the code will be valid, but at least for now Though I Know The River is Dry — a twenty minute evocative short on leaving and return in the context of Palestine — may be watched for free here on Vimeo by imputing the code ‘april’ on the payment screen.  

The film is directed by Omar Robert Hamilton, a founding member of Mosireen.

For the trailer and an interview with the director see also here.

Though I Know the River is Dry
Film still: Kais Nashef in Qalandia.

I am not sure for how long the code will be valid, but at least for now Though I Know The River is Dry — a twenty minute evocative short on leaving and return in the context of Palestine — may be watched for free here on Vimeo by imputing the code ‘april’ on the payment screen.

The film is directed by Omar Robert Hamilton, a founding member of Mosireen.

For the trailer and an interview with the director see also here.

James BaldwinDaniel Bretton Tisdale
2007
Graphite on paper.

James Baldwin
Daniel Bretton Tisdale
2007
Graphite on paper.

"[Juror Ray Tribble] explained, quite simply, that he had concurred with the defense team’s core argument: that the body fished out of the Tallahatchie River was not that of Emmett Till — who was, they claimed, still very much alive and hiding out in Chicago or Detroit or somewhere else up North — but someone else’s, a corpse planted there by the N.A.A.C.P. for the express purpose of stirring up a racial tornado that would tear through Sumner, and through all of Mississippi, and through the rest of the South, for that matter.

"… How, I asked him, could he buy such an argument? Hadn’t Emmett Till’s own mother identified the body of her son? Hadn’t that body been found wearing a ring bearing the initials LT, for Louis Till, the boy’s dead father?

"Tribble looked at me earnestly. That body, he told me, his voice assuming a didactic tone, ‘had hair on its chest.’ And everybody knows, he continued, that ‘blacks don’t grow hair on their chest until they get to be about 30.’"

— Rubin, Richard. “The Ghosts of Emmett Till.” The New York Times, 31 July 2005.

"To begin with, these celebratory representations of young Iranian women in English-language media are actually not very different from official discourses of the Islamic Republic. They share something important in common: the assumption that the surfaces of women’s bodies reflect the moral state of society at large."

— From “A Fashionable Revolution: Veiling, Morality, and Consumer Culture in Iran,” Shima Houshyar and Behzad Sarmadi, Ajam Media Collective.

(*Read in full — I found myself trying to quote three quarters of it before I gave up.)

June Jordan, Alice Walker, Lucille Clifton, and Audre Lorde. Phillis Wheatley Poetry Festival; Jackson, Mississippi, 1973. 

(via memali)

June Jordan, Alice Walker, Lucille Clifton, and Audre Lorde. Phillis Wheatley Poetry Festival; Jackson, Mississippi, 1973.

(via memali)

"Trading Game: France — Colonies" (arrayed horizontally, with tokens at right), 1941, O.P.I.M. (Office de publicite et d’impression), Breveté S.G.D.G. Lithograph on linen, 22 7/8 x 32 1/4 in. The Getty Research Institute, 970031.6.

"Published in 1941, this ‘Trading Game: France — Colonies’ aimed to teach French children the basics of colonial management.

"Players drew cards corresponding to colony names, then had to deploy cards representing assets like boats, engineers, colonists, schools, and equipment, in order to win cards representing the exports of the various colonies. … Along the way, players needed to avoid pitfalls like sickness, ‘laziness,’ and intemperance (illustrated by a cartoon of a red-cheeked white man in khakis and a white hat, served by a ‘native’ in ‘traditional’ dress). Once the cards representing a colony’s major exports had been won, the colony was considered ‘exploitée,’ and was out of the game."

— “A 1940s Board Game for French Kids Taught Tactics for Successful Colonialism,” Rebecca Onion, Slate.

(via Ajam Media Collective)

Yemen.

(via Mohammed Huwais)

Yemen.

(via Mohammed Huwais)

(via Kevin Moore | Mooretoons)

(via Kevin Moore | Mooretoons)

Reflections on the Academic Study of Women and Islam
31 January 2014

A panel discussion featuring Lila Abu-Lughod and Suad Joseph, moderated by Maya Mikdashi.

King Juan Carlos Auditorium, 53 Washington Square South, New York University, New York.

(via Hagop Kevorkian Center | NYU)

Reflections on the Academic Study of Women and Islam
31 January 2014

A panel discussion featuring Lila Abu-Lughod and Suad Joseph, moderated by Maya Mikdashi.

King Juan Carlos Auditorium, 53 Washington Square South, New York University, New York.

(via Hagop Kevorkian Center | NYU)

Alexandria.

(x)

Alexandria.

(x)

(via fyeahalex)

"The critics kill me sometimes: they want a particular poem, a particular metaphor, and if I stray up a side road they say: ‘He has betrayed the road’. And if I find eloquence in grass they say: ‘He has abandoned the steadfastness of the holm oak’. And if I see the rose in spring as yellow they ask: ‘Where is the blood of the homeland in its petals?’ And if I write: ‘It is the butterfly my youngest sister at the garden door’ they stir the meaning with a soup spoon. And if I whisper: ‘A mother is a mother, when she loses her child she withers and dries up like a stick’ they say: ‘She trills with joy and dances at his funeral for his funeral is his wedding’."

Darwish, Mahmoud. Excerpted from “Assassination.” A River Dies of Thirst: Journals. Brooklyn, NY: Archipelago, 2009.

"[W]hen using the population’s well-being as part of a military calculus, we must be aware of the stick that hides behind any carrot. Any utilitarian use of humanitarian and human rights principles must acknowledge the possibility of its inverse and the speed by which such inversion could occur. If protecting civilians is used as a way of convincing people to comply with military government, at other times inflicting pain on them might usefully achieve the same ends – such as in situations when militaries want to force civilians to exert political pressure on their governments or militants for example. According to this logic, harming civilians is not only a ‘regrettable’ collateral product of military counterinsurgency, but part of an overall logic of this form of military government …

"Military violence, then, endeavours not only to bring death and destruction to its intended targets but also to communicate with its survivors – those that remain, those not killed. … It could thus be said to have a pedagogical pretension. It is a violence that should not only convince but also manufacture the possibility for conviction."

Weizman, Eyal. The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza. London: Verso, 2011.

by  Carmel


51 plays
"… i
have offered coins wine
blood flowers and words
these words like jinn
messengers cut from
the stone of my gut
sharp target i have
cut myself on prayers
palms bleeding christ
and open to receive
a new name a
patchwork grief can’t tear 
demons no longer
in my seams”

— from “truth and offering,” Suheir Hammad, ZaatarDiva (2005).

"… i
have offered coins wine
blood flowers and words
these words like jinn
messengers cut from
the stone of my gut
sharp target i have
cut myself on prayers
palms bleeding christ
and open to receive
a new name a
patchwork grief can’t tear
demons no longer
in my seams”

from “truth and offering,” Suheir Hammad, ZaatarDiva (2005).

Opaque  by  andbamnan